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I got it!

Prof Michael Kosterlitz

Nobel Laureate 2016

Dr. Kosterlitz, (born June 22, 1943, Aberdeen, Scotland), British-born American physicist who was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in using topology to explain superconductivity in two-dimensional materials. He shared the award with British-born American physicists David Thouless and Duncan Haldane. During Kosterlitz’s first stint at Birmingham in the early 1970s, he and Thouless became interested in phase transitions in two-dimensional materials. Phase transitions happen when matter changes from one type to another; for example, when water boils, it goes through a phase transition when it changes from liquid to gas. Physicists thought that two-dimensional materials would not have phase transitions, since any order that would arise would be wiped out by random thermal fluctuations. Phenomena like superfluidity and superconductivity could not happen without phase transitions. Kosterlitz and Thouless found a topological phase transition in which pairs of vortices form at cold temperatures and then disperse as the temperature increases. This change is known as the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition (or the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless [BKT] transition) and appears in many other areas of physics.